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  • 110 volt oven conversion

    So I'm sitting here basking in the glow of the satisfaction of my first powder coted parts. And I'm thinking of all the stuff I've been meaning to have coated. Now that I have a gun, I can do it myself. But my toaster oven isn't going to be big enough for some of it. I think I can get a stove for free, I have an uncle that owns an appliance repair shop. Here's my question, can you convert a 220 volt stove to run 110 volts? I'm not well versed in household electricity, so I'm at a loss here. On the surface, it seems likea silly question, even to me. But I happen to know Harbor Freight sells a powder coat oven, and I also happen to know it's max temp is 480. And I also happen to know it runs on 110. So why can't a kitchen stove run 110? Since I won't need the burners on the stove top, can I just replace the element in the oven with a lower voltage one?

    I can run a 220 line to the basement for a stove, but my life would be easier if I didn't have to.

  • #2
    Re: 110 volt oven conversion

    Originally posted by nitsuj
    So I'm sitting here basking in the glow of the satisfaction of my first powder coted parts. And I'm thinking of all the stuff I've been meaning to have coated. Now that I have a gun, I can do it myself. But my toaster oven isn't going to be big enough for some of it. I think I can get a stove for free, I have an uncle that owns an appliance repair shop. Here's my question, can you convert a 220 volt stove to run 110 volts? I'm not well versed in household electricity, so I'm at a loss here. On the surface, it seems likea silly question, even to me. But I happen to know Harbor Freight sells a powder coat oven, and I also happen to know it's max temp is 480. And I also happen to know it runs on 110. So why can't a kitchen stove run 110? Since I won't need the burners on the stove top, can I just replace the element in the oven with a lower voltage one?

    I can run a 220 line to the basement for a stove, but my life would be easier if I didn't have to.
    I think the big difference you are going to find is the parts in the 220v stove will be designed for the 220v. By the time you switch stuff over the easy route will be to run a 220v line. Or get a natural gas stove and switch it to propane. In this topic on this link a guy tells how.http://forum.caswellplating.com/oven-bu ... -oven.html

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    • #3
      Re: 110 volt oven conversion

      I guess you could change the element to 110 but it would cost to much to run. When I first started powder coating I had the 110 HF oven jumped my elictric bill up 40 bucks a month more and thats only a couple nights a week. If you can run 220 it would be better............Oh it takes a long time for the HF oven to ge up to temp.

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      • #4
        Re: 110 volt oven conversion

        You'll be much better off just running the 220 for the oven. You'll be glad you did. PM me if you have any questions on wire size or breaker/fuse requirements.

        Best of luck.
        Dan
        sigpic

        I carry a gun because I'm too young to die, and too old to take an ass-whoopin'!

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        • #5
          Re: 110 volt oven conversion

          Yeah, I pretty much decided this was a bad idea after hearing from you all. I was just being lazy. There is an existing 220 line that goes through the basement on it's way to the kitchen. The kitchen used to have an electric stove and we switched to gas. So I just have to cut it off in the basement and put an outlet on it. So when I find a stove, I'll just do that. And maybe upgrade the breaker at the time.

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          • #6
            Re: 110 volt oven conversion

            Originally posted by polert
            I would do what everyone else is stating man. You can handle the electrical run yourself, and I would plan for the future when you build a oven of your own. Do not know your set up but here are some off the cuff ideas run a single phase 220volt circuit to your work area using 3/4 EMT, and number six conductor(wire) which will be two commons , and a ground. Purchase a 50 Amp 220 Volt breaker to punch into the breaker box. In the near future you will assemble a mid sized oven you will find that will be at least 3'X3'X6' with two element so spend once not twice. This 50 Amps circuit will be the head room you will need. The oven will cost you to build $500-$600 so that is in easy reach, and collect the free 220Volt oven elements they will save you $35 a piece
            i might be wrong here but single phase 220 conductor wire should be 2 x 110 v leads 1 red 1 black 1 common (white) and a ground wire (bare copper)

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            • #7
              Re: 110 volt oven conversion

              Originally posted by polert
              Neutral is normally know as ground also, and yes you would want to run a second ground to terminate at the enclosure.
              Sorry Polert your wrong. I will start off apologizing if I come across as rude, that is not my intention, but if we all speak with the same terminology no one will get injured while working with electricty. If you are not comfortable with electrical terminations....hire an electrician.!

              Neutral is NOT the same as ground, there are 2 seperate bus bars in the service panel. They serve 2 seperate functions although they are sometimes connected they are not the same. Subpanels have seperate "earthen/ground" and "neutral" bus bars with seperate conductors that run back to the main service panel. The "ground" is commonly called "earthed" or similar and is connected to the "ground rod" or rebar installed in the concrete foundation. Neutral is a leg that comes from the transformer to the service panel and runs parallel with the 120V lines.
              If you are using emt (metal conduit) to a metal chassis oven, emt can be used for the "ground" but not the neutral of a 110V circuit.
              This was not my best first post, and I do not mean to offend anyone but this subject is confused often and can be dangerous if misunderstood.
              This is a good forum with lots of good info. please don't ban me for my first post.
              Ron

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              • #8
                Re: 110 volt oven conversion

                Good info. Thanks for the post Ron, and welcome to the forum. I would suggest running the line exactly like polert said, but add 1 more wire. Identify one on both ends with green tape and use it for the ground. Identify both ends of another with white tape and use this as a neutral. That will leave 2 black or unmarked conductors. To feed a 120v load, use one hot (black), the white marked wire (neutral), and the ground (green) and wirenut off both ends of the spare black wire. To use it for future 220v load, use the 2nd unmarked hot (black). Some 220v appliances like ovens and dryers still incorporate the neutral (white) to run 120v timers, lights, etc. so you'll still want the neutral wire present. That is why oven outlets now have 4 prongs and always include a neutral. The older ones used to use only three conductors and utilized the ground incorrectly as the neutral path. Like Ron said, if you don't completely understand what you're doing, hire an electrician. Better safe than sorry.

                Best of luck.
                Dan
                sigpic

                I carry a gun because I'm too young to die, and too old to take an ass-whoopin'!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: 110 volt oven conversion

                  Originally posted by wiseguyz
                  The older ones used to use only three conductors and utilized the ground incorrectly as the neutral path. Like Ron said, if you don't completely understand what you're doing, hire an electrician. Better safe than sorry.
                  Thank you Wisequyz,
                  My point exactly, being an inspector, I have seen too many instances where someone "almost" understood what they were doing with electricity. Using color coded electrical tape is standard procedure and a good idea. Also when working on a circuit that is not in direct line of sight, place electrical tape over the circuit breaker you turned off. If someone else is around they won't turn that circuit back on by accident. I saw that happen once and it was not pretty, 3rd degree burns, painful and a long ride to the hospital. Not to mention $$$ lost from not being able to work! Tape 'em off!

                  California code allows the emt to be used as a ground (not neutral) provided there is a continuous unbroken electrical connection back to the service panel.
                  Ron

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